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Enjoyment Factor In Fitness

Mar 20, 2013  |  Category: Mindset

When it comes to non-sedentary individuals, there are two types of people: the ones who moan about going to the gym, and the ones who get excited about it. It doesn’t come as a surprise that the first ones never really get any substantial results. They just roll up to the gym looking displeased, spend ages getting changed, drag themselves onto the gym floor and start mindlessly going through the motions on the cross trainer for an extended warm-up while watching the TV. That’s if the desired piece of equipment is available. If it isn’t, they just keep watching the TV while holding on to their towel and water bottle. Then they probably do a little round with the resistance machines for upper body with sloppy form, and finish the session with a bit of stretch. Do you know anyone like this?

The other type knows exactly what they want. They either have a plan, or they train instinctively as it has become their second nature. They don’t make excuses, and nothing will stop them from having a great workout if it is supposed to be a training day. They just get it done. That doesn’t mean that they have become obsessed or fanatic about fitness. They are just programming themselves for success and manage their time well. Fitness has become embedded in their lifestyle, and they are enjoying the health benefits, love looking their best and having supreme confidence. They have also learned to use this amazing feeling to achieve great success in other areas of their life. I call it the high-flyer mindset.

People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing.

~ Dale Carnegie

So what makes so many people fall into the first category? How do you join the 2% at the top of the pyramid? Let’s examine some of the reasons that can destroy the enjoyment factor, and will hold you back from achieving success:

- Stress

This evil thing has the capability to erase all your efforts. In order to have a good workout you must leave all your problems at the door. Condition yourself to get into the right state of mind straight away. You’re at the gym for a reason. You have a mission to fulfill and are maintaining a deep sense of purpose. Be in the moment. Release all the frustrations physically in order to fix up yourself mentally. Exercise does indeed make everything better.

- Rush

You must allocate enough time for your workout. Or alternatively you can adopt circuit style training, or use intensity techniques like supersets, drop sets and rest pause to get as much done as possible in a short space of time. That doesn’t mean that you should skip a good warm-up consisting of dynamic stretching and isolation exercises using light weights to get the muscle attachments, ligaments, joints and tendons ready to handle heavier loads.

- Doubt

Just believe in yourself. Have a high sense of value in what you’re doing. Get excited about the challenge, as this is what will help you on your journey to become the best version of yourself.  You have taken time out of your day to work towards a certain outcome. Hence, you should do everything to get a maximum return on your investment. Keep the end game in mind and make the most of your workout.

What if you haven’t managed to use the enjoyment factor in fitness because you don’t quite know what to do in the gym? If you are an exercise newbie, and you’re looking to get results and not waste your time, you have two choices. You could study training & nutrition from credible sources diligently absorbing information and testing through trial and error, like I have been consistently doing for more than 11 years. Or you can get someone to help you and guide you down the right path. Maybe you have a friend or relative that has been achieving some great results. Alternatively you may want to consider bespoke personal training to turn your dreams into reality. You get out of life what you put in. Only you have the power to decide how much you are willing to give in order to achieve your desired outcome.


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